A Nightmare on Timeshare Street

A Letter to Timeshare Developers and ARDA

Law Enforcement, Military and Lawmakers

Our Mission to Stop Timeshare Crime – Front and Back


February 9, 2018

By Scotty Black, M.S. Criminal Justice, former Navy

Promissory Note $65,741.14 @ 14.4309%

How I got here

  • Purchased 5000 timeshare points October 2014 Scottsdale AZ CA Collection
  • Purchase price $13,000
  • October 13, 2016 in Hawaii we bought 15,000 additional points
  • Name of sales agent Brian Holmes
  • Purchase price is $75,710
  • $4500 on a resort issued Barclaycard used for the down payment
  • Monthly payment $1,037.84
  • Maintenance fees $4,006.22

I am one of 22 active duty, retired military, law enforcement agents, feeling victimized by timeshare. For my family, I would describe timeshare as a parasite killing its host. Like Amanda and George Jones, I’m worried about losing my security clearance. Like, Lela Renea, I work in law enforcement. Like Kevin Hopkins, I am military trained in Electronic Warfare. I never imagined we would need that training to fight in a Timeshares War. Kevin is retired Air Force. I served in the Navy. My primary job was Electronic Warfare, but partly due to my attitude, I was sent often to security, so I ended up assigned to the Special Security Force, Battleship Missouri. The fact that this is the second complaint in a matter of weeks from an electronic warfare veteran and that there are 22 of us working, or having served to protect our country, filing timeshare complaints, is telling.

Kevin was featured in this article on January 30 unidentified, but as Kevin has since received his automatic knee-jerk, “Sorry, you signed a contract” denial, Kevin has been identified and has joined the ranks of Inside Timeshare Contributors.

Kevin’s sales agent managed to work in every oral misrepresentation possible into one presentation. He’s working on an upcoming article about his experience.  

Timeshare companies have negatively affected national security with their fraudulent sales practices. Active duty Navy Technicians George and Amanda Jones could be forced into foreclosure. They say they were assured by two sales agents in two separate states they could lower their 18% loan interest rate by contacting finance companies offering a lower rate or a military rate. “Just Google it,” their sales agent said. Banks do not finance timeshares. Consumer credit issues can cause a revocation of security clearance. Jeff is in the process of writing to the Commandant of the Marines.

Jeff Diehl, former Marine, purchased a timeshare at Vacation Village

Lela Renea, a detective, who purchased a Bluegreen timeshare

Amanda and George Jones, active duty Navy, purchased a Diamond timeshare

We have summarized our reports from our 22 unit members and have reached out to Whistleblowers of America, an organization that seeks justice for military and government employees. If you are not drowning in timeshare loan payments, credit card payments and maintenance fees, consider a donation.

Here’s what happened

In Hawaii, October 2016, we asked our timeshare sales agent Brian Holmes what would happen in the event we could no longer make payments. As we were told in Arizona, we were told again points could be rented and that we would be able to sell the points, likely at a profit, especially since we purchased them at such a low price – a price so low because “a sales staff member forgot to file the declination of purchasing more shares in a previous presentation…!”


We were told Hawaii points are a good investment. This sticks in my mind because my wife had to write a statement to that effect, so the purchase at such a low rate could go through. As for the potential of profit, we were told there is a land-usage moratorium on how many places and percent of the land can be built on in Hawaii so this would also make the points appreciate, even with a speculation of over $10 per point. We were told we would need to sell points through the secondary market but that would be easy.

We have since learned our vacation points have no secondary market and that renting points through a third part website is not allowed. I contacted members of the Licensed Timeshare Resale Broker AssociationNot one I spoke with would even accept a listing for our Diamond points feeling the restrictions placed on the use of secondary points renders the points worthless. Since LTRB members, unlike some scam timeshare exit companies, do not accept an upfront fee, it’s a waste of their time to accept a listing.  

In Scottsdale, at an “owners update” early September 2017, long after the issuance of the Arizona Attorney General’s Assurance of Discontinuance, we experienced yet another highly aggressive sales presentation. The length of the presentation was a violation of the AOD. We complained repeatedly that we wanted to leave. We were told it was not a sales presentation and they would not try to sell us points, but after the 55 minute presentation we were paired with a sales agent for at least two hours.  My wife had broken her foot on resort property the prior day and was in pain. She had to keep her boot elevated. They still did everything they could to keep us from leaving. I still was experiencing symptoms from a car wreck that had required a hospitalization. We were both on painkillers.  

Ultimately, I contacted Irene Parker and our Timeshare Advocacy Facebook group.

Irene suggested I contact Diamond’s Consumer Advocacy Department, which I feel has nothing to do with consumers. The “hospitality” agents are fine print detectives, in my opinion.

Irene explained about Diamond’s new Quality Assurance program, CLARITY, launched after the AOD was issued. CLARITY is reported to be about accountability, transparency and respect for the customer, but as Irene predicted, our Hospitality agent referred us to the oral representation clause. I ask what purpose CLARITY serves, other than a piece of paper to hand out to provide a false sense of security, making it seem like the company cares about false promises made by sales agents.

Researching timeshare in general, I have come to believe many timeshare sales agents employ tactics that meet the FBI’s definition of white-collar crime, Financial Institution Fraud, defined as “deceit, concealment, violation of trust and bait and switch.” Timeshare buyers who feel they were victimized should file complaints with the following agencies:

  1. The Better Business Bureau
  2. The Attorneys General (The AGs where you signed, where the firm is headquartered, and where you live)
  3. State Real Estate Divisions against the individual agent
  4. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
  5. The FBI (if as serious as mine at and orally through a field office public access line #4 prompt, then #3 white-collar crime prompt)
  6. The FTC if you have any energy left

Other agencies that investigate multinational and cross-border financial institutions

We know criminal actions on the part of timeshare sales agents extend beyond any one resort, except for Disney Vacation ClubSomehow they manage to show a profit without resorting to deceit.

mickey mouse

Hopefully, timeshare executives and lobbyists will read this. We know one lawmaker has.

If you need help, call us.

This article was originally published on Inside Timeshare under Friday’s Letter from America series, CLA International thanks Inside Timeshare for the use of the article.

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